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Low-Fat Dairy

Kids Learn From Watching You. Eat Vegetables and Fruits and Your Kids Will Too!


Your health is important to you. Choose foods wisely and take care of you. Switch to fat-free or low-fat (1%) dairy foods. Fat-free or low-fat (1%) dairy foods have all the vitamins and minerals without all the fat.

A few examples of fat-free and low-fat (1%) dairy foods:

Which milk is right for you?

  1. Babies less than 1 year old need breast milk or iron-fortified formula.
  2. Most children between 1-2 years old drink whole milk.
  3. Fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk is best for everyone over age two.

Family Fun Low-Fat Dairy

Enjoy these activities with your kids for a fun way to teach them about nutrition and physical activity.

Simon Says: Enjoy Low-Fat and Fat-Free Dairy Foods


Explain that low-fat and fat-free dairy products include milk, yogurt and cheese. Play "Simon Says" to encourage kids to learn about low-fat and fat-free milk and other dairy foods while they move as much as possible. Ask the children to march in place, skip in a circle, or rock back and forth throughout the game. Children only do the special movement that you ask them to do when you start with "Simon Says". If you do not say "Simon Says", the children will continue to march, skip, or rock. Here are some dairy facts to get you started and then have fun sharing your own:


  1. Jump up three times if you like eating low-fat yogurt.
  2. Slide to the right if you knew milk came from cows.
  3. Moo like a cow if you knew that drinking milk makes your bones stronger.
  4. Fly like a bird if you if you drank low-fat or fat-free milk at lunch.
  5. Stretch up high and try to touch the sky if you eat string cheese.

Calcium Finder


Calcium is necessary for building strong bones. Bones grow fastest during the tween and teen years. Tweens and teens ages 9 to 18 need the most calcium–1,300 milligrams (mg) of calcium every day–of all age groups


  1. Collect empty low-fat and fat-free dairy food containers.
  2. Have older ones pick foods they would eat each day and add up the milligrams of calcium from the different food labels until they reach 1,300 milligrams of calcium for the day.
  3. For younger children, have them pick three low-fat and fat-free dairy foods they would eat today.

All About Low-Fat Dairy

Educate your friends and family with these fun facts. Click on one of the facts below to learn something new.

All About Whole Grains

Dairy foods are milk and milk products, such as milk, cheese, and yogurt.

Milk products are foods that have been made from milk, such as milk, cheese, and yogurt.

Fat-free dairy foods are milk and milk products that have no fat.

Fat-free milk, yogurt, and cheese

Low-fat (1%) dairy foods are milk and milk products that have little fat.

Low-fat (1%) milk, yogurt, and cheese.

Adults need 3 cups (or 24 ounces) of dairy each day; this can include 1 cup of milk or yogurt, 1½ ounces of natural cheese (cheddar, mozzarella, Swiss, Parmesan), or 2 ounces of processed cheese (American).

Yes! Fat-free and low-fat (1%) milk are packed with the same nutrients as whole milk without all the fat.

The best choices are fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk and milk products. Because these contain little or no fat, it's easy to get enough calcium without adding extra fat.

  1. Fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk is best for everyone over age 2.
  2. Most children between 1-2 years old drink whole milk.
  3. Babies less than 1 year old need breast milk or iron-fortified formula.
  1. Children ages 2-3 need 2 cups or 16 ounces of milk each day.
  2. Children ages 4-8 need 2½ cups or 20 ounces of milk each day.
  3. Older children and teens ages 9-18, like adults, need 3 cups or 24 ounces of milk each day.

In general, 1 cup of milk or yogurt, 1½ ounces of natural cheese (cheddar, mozzarella, Swiss, Parmesan), or 2 ounces of processed cheese (American) is equal to 1 cup from the milk group.

Try these tips to help make the switch to low-fat (1%) milk:

  1. Take it slowly. First change to reduced-fat (2%) milk for a few weeks, and then switch to low-fat (1%) milk. Later, you can try fat-free milk.
  2. Try low-fat (1%) yogurt. If some family members don't like milk, try offering low-fat (1%) or fat-free yogurt.
  3. Try different forms of low-fat (1%) cheese. There are many kinds you can try. For example, start with low-fat (1%) cheddar – it's delicious melted on a whole wheat bagel.

Yes! Fat-free and low-fat (1%) milk contain lots of calcium in a form that the body can easily absorb. Milk also contains vitamin D, which helps the body absorb more calcium.

To help our bones and teeth grow and stay strong.

From the day you're born, calcium builds and strengthens yours bones.

They have little or no calcium.

Recipes
Low-Fat Dairy

Meet Champion Mom Patty

Recognizing amazing moms from Arizona, and what makes them champions.


“That's what I was raised on. Milk helps you grow strong.”

- Patty,
Champion Mom from Arizona


Patty knows her kids are still growing. She helps her kids grow strong by serving fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk at meals.

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